I’m Still Here!

Gah. So, while I did write up posts for the last two days on the Project Me theme, my site was down for a bit and things didn’t actually get sent through. Which ties in a bit with what I wanted to write about today: Loneliness in a world where we are all so connected.

First, watch this video from Shimi Cohen.

We can all relate to this video, I’m sure, to some extent. I’m happy to say that I do connect with my people relatively regularly and with meaning beyond the means of social networks. We may still use new technologies, including the messaging capabilities of said networks, but, in general, this is more to foster that connection until we are able to schedule face time into our full calendars.

Recently, I’ve been feeling more of a need to disengage from the likes of when I feel lonely instead of running to it. Recognising that I want the better quality connections, I’ve shut out the noise and, fortunately, have several real-life friends that I do connect with regularly. For me, however, the aspect of loneliness stems from other wounds and isn’t always satisfied by my friend engagements. But that’s subject for another post.

In today’s society, it is very easy to get roped into a world of misperception, seeing just surface presentations, the lens of focus hiding all the parts of our friends’ and celebrities’ lives that are more dark and gritty and real. We compare what we see to our lives and we start judging ourselves on lack of achievement. There is an interesting article on Huffington post on this. I don’t agree with everything in the article. However, the point made about how we individually present ourselves, particularly on platforms like and , can sometimes be deceiving for our viewers.

Naturally we want to be seen in the best light. We don’t always want people to know that we’re struggling, unless, of course, we’re craving a few sympathy cards. So it makes sense that we put up and share only the aspects of our life that make us feel better. There’s nothing inherently at fault with this. It’s when we look at what others are posting and actively compare them to us, while remaining isolated in our bubbles, without actually engaging with people, actually fleshy people that we share interests and thoughts with, that we can really get in touch with our respective depressions and lonelinesses.

I have found that writing allows me far more time to think and construct more witty and intriguing ways of expressing myself, even just those extra milliseconds taken to foster the thought as I type gives me an edge over speaking. My persona can be presented very differently in type than in vocals. Mind you, as a performer, given some time, I can just as easily present a different persona visually but I do need either time to prepare it or an archived character in my head to play with.

I think that everyone should have an outlet to perform, to re-enact those imaginary games from our childhoods when we could be anything from princesses to space cowboys. Social networking gives us the platform to do that. We don’t all need to seek careers in performance just to engage our imagination and play-play every now and again. The trick is to recognise that it is play-play. Yes, engage with the real world, live your life as fully as you are able, and know that life happens when you’re not scrolling through your . Continue to seek out the quality of life, the essence of friendships and activities that feed your soul.